Camp Akeela Wisconsin Fall 2019 News

The latest edition of the Akeela WI Circular is here!

In this edition of our newsletter:

  • Notes from Mike and Kristin
  • Program updates for 10th grade campers!
  • POISE-a-thon recap
  • Fall birthdays for campers and staff
  • Welcoming Arlo & Simon Trimble!
  • Upcoming Akeela travel plans (with camper reunion date!)
  • Re-enrollment reminder and early bird discount
  • Summer highlights from Akeela and Beyond Akeela!

Read the entire newsletter here!

You can also find this note from Kevin, Kristin, and Mike in the newsletter:

Dear Akeela Families,

When we all return home at the end of each summer we often get the common question from our non-camp family and friends, “So, how was the summer?” It’s a simple and very appropriate question, and yet each year we struggle to find an answer that really encapsulates our summer experiences. Saying, “Great!” just doesn’t seem to give justice to our summer experience. Do you feel this way when you return home, too?

So much happens every day at camp. We experience emotional highs during those magical spontaneous moments, and have to acknowledge that spending as much time as we do around others during each day at camp is going to create some moments of disagreement and stress, which is OKAY. Taking time to reflect on those highs and lows both individually and with our peers each day helps make camp such a special place for us all. Sometimes it feels like we’ve lived a whole separate life for the summer, and trying to explain that to someone who didn’t share those experiences with us is a daunting task!

As we look back on this summer, saying “Great!” is a good start to describing to our time at camp, but there is so much more that we can share. There was that time we went on a hike and took a wrong turn, got really muddy, but sang songs and played games along the way to keep everyone in positive spirits. Or that time when a few campers were uncertain about showing off our talents in front of all of camp, but blew all of their friends away with their performance. We remember seeing the joy and pride on camper’s faces after that so vividly. We remember the feeling of community when each of you made announcements about your new friends in camp, even if you were unsure about meeting someone new. We remember the feeling of friendship that you shared with us by going out to breakfast with a new friend and their family on pickup day.

We hope that as you think back on your summer at camp, that you can reflect fondly on those special moments, the new friendships you made, and acknowledge the hardships you persevered through. We can’t wait to share all of that with you again, and hope that we can all help each other answer the question, “So, how was your summer?” next year.

Fondly,
Kevin, Kristin, and Mike


Akeela VT Fall Newsletter

The Akeela Vermont Fall Circular is here!

In this edition of our newsletter:

  • An update from our program director about exciting things to look forward to in summer 2020
  • Our gratitude for all of the Akeela families who completed their post-camp surveys
  • The 6th annual Winter Weekend will be January 11-12, 2020!
  • Check out a few photos of camp during prime “leaf-peeping” season
  • Congratulations to Kevin and Kristin Trimble, who recently welcomed twin boys to their family
  • POISE-a-thon results
  • Upcoming birthdays

Read the entire newsletter here.

Also in the newsletter is the following letter from Debbie and Eric:

Dear Campers,

We can’t believe how quickly time has passed. It seems like yesterday that we were all at camp singing “Friends, Friends, Friends” on the shores of Miller Pond. Suddenly, the trees are changing colors here in Philadelphia and we’re wearing our sweaters. We thought this was a great opportunity to remind you of some of your amazing successes at camp this past summer. Sometimes, after something has ended, it’s hard to remember all of the great feelings you had about it and what you learned. While at Camp Akeela …

  • You made your own bed EVERY DAY!
  • You helped clean your bunk EVERY DAY!
  • You helped with “dining hall duty” with your bunk.
  • You participated in meal-time discussions with your bunkmates and counselors.
  • You participated in activities, even new things that made you uncomfortable.
  • You considered the feelings & needs of the rest of the community.
  • You survived without electronics or internet access for three and a half weeks!
  • You made connections with other campers.
  • You spoke at an Evening Meeting or were recognized at an Evening Meeting.
  • You went on a hike every week.
  • You left the comfort of your home and your family to be at Akeela.

We hope you take this opportunity to think back on your time at camp and remember your friends. You should know that your friends are thinking of you too! We think it would be a great idea to email or call your friends from Akeela. You might tell them about your new teacher, your activities outside of school and anything you’re doing for fun. Maybe you’d like to send them a picture of you in your Halloween costume!

As always, we’re thinking of you with great fondness and can’t wait to be together again at camp.

Love,

Eric & Debbie

Read the entire newsletter here.


Post-Camp September Blues

After we move our family home from camp and get our daughters settled back into their school routines, I spend most of the fall talking to parents about camp and the transition home and into a new school year. It’s often a challenging time for our campers and parents too! What I hear most often is this, “I don’t get it. He was so successful at camp and he came home and was happy and texting with camp friends. He even made his own bed for a while without prompting. Now that school’s started, he’s just reverted back to his old ways.” Yes. We know!

So, here’s the question: Did the magic of camp just wear off or did something else happen? I think the answer is BOTH.

There is a lot that we can do at camp that is challenging for you as parents at home to mimic. For example, our campers live with 7 other kids their age and have 4 staff members dedicated to those campers 24/7. The positive peer pressure that comes from living in a community and wanting to be a part of that group is really powerful. When everyone is going to an activity – even one that a camper may “refuse” to do at home – she goes and even participates because that’s what everyone else is doing! When something less preferred is on the table at dinner and the coolest counselor at the table says, “Broccoli? Pass that to me. I LOVE broccoli!”, suddenly, your camper who refuses to eat any veggies at home is willing to at least take one bite. You just can’t mimic that at home and I’ll venture to guess that even the coolest parent doesn’t have the same influence that our staff can! In addition, our campers feel relaxed at Akeela. They don’t have homework or the stress of being in an environment where there are confined to small, noisy, crowded spaces. They are running around, playing on 400 acres of beautiful woods. They have very few demands placed on them (outside of the 24/7 social demands) and they feel like they can be themselves. By living in a community where they are with friends and staff who “get” them, they can enjoy friendships and a sense of pride that they can’t find at school.

And then, yes, something likely “happens” in the fall. The start of school brings with it the reminders of unkind classmates, demanding teachers, or even teachers who aren’t demanding enough. Most importantly, it brings a world of people who don’t really get it. That’s exhausting and it’s upsetting for a lot of our campers. At the end of 2nd session, a lot of our campers talk to us about how nervous they are to leave. They wish that camp was year-round so they didn’t have to deal with school. Don’t get me wrong, most of our campers are brilliant and love to learn but school can sometimes take the joy out of that.

So – what can you do at home?

  • You can make sure that you’re normalizing all of these feelings for your child.
  • You can remind them that keeping in touch with camp friends, although time-consuming, is really energizing and healthy. These are the people who “get” you after all! They will need guidance with this – they may not know where to start when it comes to having a relationship with someone they don’t see in school. Help them compose an email, practice how to call someone to invite them over, teach them how to Skype or Facetime (and then stay close by the first few times to make sure they don’t need help to keep the conversation going).
  • You can set some expectations – just like at camp! You can tell your child that they are responsible for certain things around the house like: making their own bed, doing their own laundry (or at least folding it and putting it away – neatly!). Please remind your child that she was able to do all of that at camp and there’s no reason not to do it at home as well. This will give your child a sense of pride and the knowledge that you believe they are capable. For our camper who struggle with Executive Functioning, a checklist is very helpful.
  • Encourage your child to help prepare a meal once a week. This often helps with trying new foods. Kids are more apt to TRY things they’ve put an effort into making! (It works at camp in our cooking classes!)
  • Finally, feel free to call us any time! We’re always here to help.

Akeela WI Circular – Spring Edition!

The newest edition of the Akeela circular for our Wisconsin families is here! See what’s inside:

  • Letter from the directors
  • What to expect on the first day of camp
  • How we assign counselors to bunks
  • Geography update
  • Camp forms
  • Upcoming staff/camper birthdays
  • Pen pals
  • What’s new for 2019!
  • Double session campers inter-session plan
  • POISE
  • Information about optional and choice trips
  • Parent communication at Akeela
  • Important reminders for the summer!

Akeela VT Spring Newsletter

The Akeela Spring Circular for our Vermont campers and their families is here!

In this issue of our camp newsletter:

  • A letter from Eric and Debbie
  • What to expect on the first day of camp
  • How we assign counselors to cabin groups
  • A list of first-year Akeela campers!
  • An invitation to enrolled families to attend our Open House in June
  • A snapshot of all the places in the world that Akeela campers come from
  • Introductions to head counselors and program heads
  • A detailed description of the kinds of communication that parents can expect with camp during the summer
  • Important reminders about forms, optional programs, medication at camp, sending bags to camp, and ordering camp clothing
  • Photos and updates from this winter’s construction projects at camp
  • Upcoming birthdays and much more!

 

Check out the entire newsletter here!

 


Akeela VT Circular Winter Edition!

The Akeela Winter Circular for our Vermont campers and their families is here!

In this issue of our camp newsletter:

  • A letter from Eric and Debbie
  • It’s not too early to start planning for camp! A planner for campers and parents as camp approaches
  • See what fellow campers and staff members have been up to since last summer
  • Notes from leadership team members Ben and Rob
  • Akeela Alumnus Spotlight
  • Upcoming birthdays, wedding bells, and much more!

Check out the entire newsletter here!


Winter Weekend 2019

We had a great time at our FIFTH annual Winter Weekend reunion for our Vermont campers. Winter Storm Harper couldn’t stop the Akeela magic over the weekend! Campers reunited with their best friends and made new connections with other Akeela campers, the Akeela spirit was in the air! It is remarkable to watch our campers jump right back into camp mode when their with each other, no matter the location or weather outside. They shared stories, played games, and strengthened their bonds with one another over the course a chilly and snowy weekend. Weekends like this get us even more excited for the summer, when we get to see all of our friends back together again.

See the link below for a photo recap of our Winter Weekend fun:
Winter Weekend 2019 Photos

See you this summer!


Happy Holidays and 2018 Vermont Camp Slideshows

Happy holidays from your friends at Camp Akeela! We’re thinking of all our camp friends during this season, and can’t wait to be back at camp with you in 2019. Below you will find slide shows from Vermont’s first and second sessions. We hope you’ll watch them and that they’ll help remind you of all the magical times we spent together last summer. Wishing everyone a safe and happy rest of the holiday season!

Love,

Debbie, Eric, Kevin and Rob

2018 Session 1 Slideshow (VT)

The Akeela Campers

2018 Session 2 Slideshow (VT)

The Akeela Campers

Why Camp is Important for Teens Too.

Why Camp is still Important for High School Students

I recently had a conversation with a long-time Camp Akeela parent.  She was wondering whether or not camp was still an appropriate summer option for her 10th grader.  After many years at Akeela, she wondered if it was time to move on. So to encourage her son to get a job or to take summer classes.  She is certainly not alone in asking these questions.  As parents, many of us constantly worry if we’re making the right choices for our children.  Are we pushing them enough?  Are we pushing too hard?  And how much should we push during the summer?  Many parents wonder if their kids need some down time. And others worry that too much unstructured time leads to feeling depressed or lonely or even more anxious.

The transition phase for important life skill

As camp directors, it’s probably obvious that we believe that for most kids, camp is an amazing opportunity for our older teens.   For our long-time campers, one final summer as “the oldest”, is like a graduation year.  They benefit from feeling like they are the leaders in the community. That they have knowledge and wisdom about life that they can share with their younger peers.  It also enables them to learn how to transition away from childhood.  So many of our oldest campers struggle with saying goodbye. Either avoiding it all-together or becoming so emotional that it overwhelms other people.  Having a final summer at camp with peers who are going through the same transition is an opportunity to teach them. This very important life skill which will continue to come up as they begin new experiences and then have to leave them (college, jobs, relationships…etc.).

Camp Akeela Experience

We also believe that there is an important arc to the Akeela experience.  One where campers build upon skills they’ve developed in other years at Akeela.  In their oldest years at camp, our teens get more choice in their activity. More freedom to be in camp with less direct (obvious) supervision and opportunities to lead activities. And also to be role-models for younger campers.

After 9th and 10th grades, our campers participate in our “Teen Time” program where they can choose to participate in writing and performing Camp News. Or STEM projects (robotics and building an escape room) and community leadership (planning and running a camp activity and working closely with a younger bunk of campers).  In addition, our oldest teens benefit from guided conversations around topics that are particularly salient to that age group such as romantic relationships, appropriate use of social media and technology and wellness (mental health, hygiene, sleep and nutrition).

Finally, camp is fun.  While of course we believe there is value to learning how important it is to work hard and to earn money. We also think that finding opportunities for our campers to really connect with peers in a meaningful way. To feel totally accepted and to be a part of a community where they are valued is just not something that can be undervalued.  As our campers prepare for life beyond high school, we want them to head in to that next phase of their lives. On feeling secure in who they are.  We believe camp allows them to do that.