Teen camp – Midwest and Vermont

Why Camp is still Important for High School Students

I recently had a conversation with a long-time Camp Akeela parent.  She was wondering whether or not camp was still an appropriate summer option for her 10th grader.  After many years at Akeela, she wondered if it was time to move on. So to encourage her son to get a job or to take summer classes.  She is certainly not alone in asking these questions.  As parents, many of us constantly worry if we’re making the right choices for our children.  Are we pushing them enough?  Are we pushing too hard?  And how much should we push during the summer?  Many parents wonder if their kids need some down time. And others worry that too much unstructured time leads to feeling depressed or lonely or even more anxious.

The transition phase for important life skill

As camp directors, it’s probably obvious that we believe that for most kids, camp is an amazing opportunity for our older teens.   For our long-time campers, one final summer as “the oldest”, is like a graduation year.  They benefit from feeling like they are the leaders in the community. That they have knowledge and wisdom about life that they can share with their younger peers.  It also enables them to learn how to transition away from childhood.  So many of our oldest campers struggle with saying goodbye. Either avoiding it all-together or becoming so emotional that it overwhelms other people.  Having a final summer at camp with peers who are going through the same transition is an opportunity to teach them. This very important life skill which will continue to come up as they begin new experiences and then have to leave them (college, jobs, relationships…etc.).

Teen camp Midwest: Camp Akeela Experience

We also believe that there is an important arc to the Akeela experience.  One where campers build upon skills they’ve developed in other years at Akeela.  In their oldest years at camp, our teens get more choice in their activity. More freedom to be in camp with less direct (obvious) supervision and opportunities to lead activities. And also to be role-models for younger campers.

After 9th and 10th grades, our campers participate in our “Teen Time” program where they can choose to participate in writing and performing Camp News. Or STEM projects (robotics and building an escape room) and community leadership (planning and running a camp activity and working closely with a younger bunk of campers).  In addition, our oldest teens benefit from guided conversations around topics that are particularly salient to that age group such as romantic relationships, appropriate use of social media and technology and wellness (mental health, hygiene, sleep and nutrition).

Finally, camp is fun.  While of course we believe there is value to learning how important it is to work hard and to earn money. We also think that finding opportunities for our campers to really connect with peers in a meaningful way. To feel totally accepted and to be a part of a community where they are valued is just not something that can be undervalued.  As our campers prepare for life beyond high school, we want them to head in to that next phase of their lives. On feeling secure in who they are.  We believe camp allows them to do that.